Artiodactyla

Suidae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
North Sulawesi Babirusa
Babyrousa celebensis (Deninger, 1909)
1933E London Seth-Smith (1936) p120: We have a gentleman babirussa and a lady babirussa, and their names are Jacob and Rachael. They have a lovely baby babirussa, born in 1933 and now almost grown up. She has been named Ruth. London 1884 dns. Three living species of Babirusa are now recognised, but London's animals appear to have belonged to the North Sulawesi species B. celebensis. The first Babirusa to reach England arrived at London in 1841 and was probably also a member of this species.
Zoo Federation News, No. 53, Autumn 1988/Spring 1989 under Breeding & Husbandry Awards for 1989: First Captive Breeding in the U. K. Progeny reared to independence naturally. Jersey 3 born 1985-1988,
Common Warthog
Phacochoerus africanus (Gmelin, 1788)
1957 Whipsnade Zoological Society of London Report of the Council and Auditors for 1957 (picture caption): A family of Warthogs. The young, born on the 30th March 1957, are believed to be the first to be reared in this country. In 2007, the Zoological Society of London advertised some old prints for sale including one image showing a keeper bottle-feeding a very young Warthog with the caption "H. Warwick with baby Warthog, 1922." Flower (1929) listed no births of this species so the offspring may not have survived.
Red River Hog
Potamochoerus porcus (Linnaeus, 1758)
1856* London Flower (1929) p335: About fifteen born in the Gardens 1856-1902.
Bearded Pig
Sus barbatus Müller, 1838
2003 London Zoo Federation: Lifelines (No. 83, December 2003): For two of the three female bearded pigs this was their first successful rearing of litters.
Visayan Warty Pig
Sus cebifrons negrinus Sanborn, 1952
2008 Chester North of England Zoological Society Annual Report 2008, Appendix 6 Stock List: Mammals.
Pygmy Hog
Sus salvanius (Hodgson, 1847)
May 1883 dns London Edwards (1996) p179: Four were born in the Zoo on 23 May 1883, one on 16 May 1884, three on 11 June 1885 and one on 23 June 1886. None survived for longer than a month, a number being eaten by their mother.
Wild Boar
Sus scrofa Linnaeus, 1758
Early 17th C* ? Lever (1992) p12: Charles I (1600-49) stocked the royal parks with wild boar from Europe.
Indian Wild Boar
Sus scrofa cristatus Wagner, 1839
1892E London Flower (1929) p333 as S. cristatus: At least twenty-six born in the Gardens 1892-1902.
Formosan Wild Boar
Sus scrofa taivanus (Swinhoe, 1863)
1867*† London Flower (1929) p333 as S. taivanus: Three or four born in the Gardens 12 Oct. 1867.

Tayassuidae Palmer, 1897

Taxon Date Location Notes
Collared Peccary
Pecari tajacu (Linnaeus, 1758)
Early 18th C ? Peccaries were kept, and probably bred, at a number of private estates in the 18th century including Kew, Surrey (1740+), Horton, Northamptonshire (1763+) and Windsor Park (1764+). Further research required.
White-lipped Peccary
Tayassu pecari (Link, 1795)
Mar 1964 Dudley International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 6 (1966) p198, as T. albirostris. The group of 1.2 adults produced three litters during 1964.

Hippopotamidae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Pygmy Hippopotamus
Hexaprotodon liberiensis (Morton, 1849)
May 1930 London Berridge (1932) p72: At 8.30 a.m., on May 10th, 1930, the first pygmy hippopotamus ever born in captivity saw the light of day at the London Zoo, the parents being "Percy the Second" and "Jean". The infant was christened "May". May was sent to Calcutta Zoo, India in 1931. The first Pygmy Hippo to reach the Western world arrived at Dublin Zoo in March 1873 but only survived for one month. The first to survive was a female named Diana who arrived at London Zoo in February 1913 and later produced the second UK calf (Jack) in November 1930.
Common Hippopotamus
Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758
Nov 1872 London Sclater (1901) p201: The most important births were two Hippopotamuses. The first, a male, was born on January 6th, and died on January 10th. On November 5th, the second, a female, was born, and named 'Guy Fawkes,' ... It is noteworthy that this calf was reared by its dam; the only case of rearing a young Hippopotamus up to that time having been been in the Gardens at Amsterdam. Guy Fawkes lived at the zoo until her death in 1908. The sire was Obaysch who, in 1850, was the first Hippopotamus to reach Europe alive in modern times.

Camelidae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Bactrian Camel
Camelus bactrianus Linnaeus, 1758
Jan 1864E Hackney Middlemiss (1987) p11 (quoting Illustrated London News, 30 Jan 1864): The baby camel ... was born about a fortnight ago, at Mr Connor's Prince of Wales Waterloo Livery Stables, Hackney. Its mother was housed there at night, with the other animals forming part of James Edmonds' (late Wombwell's collection ...
Arabian Camel
Camelus dromedarius Linnaeus, 1758
Sep 1837E London Flower (1929) p330: Three born in the Gardens - 8 Spet. 1837, 22 Feb. 1841, and 12 April, 1912.
Llama
Lama glama glama (Linnaeus, 1758)
ca.1810sE Woburn Reference needed. A llama was exhibited for the first time in 1805 but they were kept privately - and possibly bred - before this date.
Alpaca
Lama glama glama (Linnaeus, 1758)
1820s ? Probably Knowsley, Windsor or Wentworth. Wombwell's travelling menagerie advertised the first Alpaca in the country ca.1821. However, showmen often made dubious claims. Synonym: pacos.
Guanaco
Lama glama guanicoe (Müller, 1776)
Early 19th CE KnowsleyMoore (1851) p7.
Vicugna
Vicugna vicugna (Molina, 1782)
Early 19th C Knowsley Knowsley may have been the location of the first breeding - see Appendix 1.

Tragulidae Milne-Edwards, 1864

Chevrotains of uncertain identity were born at London Zoo in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century but none were reared: The identification of the Mouse-Deers that have lived in the Gardens is doubtful: javanicus is recorded from 1829, kanchil in 1831, napu from 1836 ... Four born in the Gardens 1870-1922: one, in 1913, lived for three weeks (Flower, 1929, p328).

Taxon Date Location Notes
Water Chevrotain
Hyemoschus aquaticus (Ogilby, 1841)
Jan 1883*† London Flower (1929) p329: One born in the Gardens 24 Jan. 1883.
Indian Spotted Chevrotain
Moschiola meminna (Erxleben, 1777)
ca.1830s† Knowsley Woolfall (1990) p16.
Lesser Malay Chevrotain
Tragulus javanicus (Osbeck, 1765)
1996E Middleton The Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland Mammal Inventory 1996, p57. The captive population may , in fact, be T. kanchil, or hybrids of the two species.
Greater Mouse-deer
Tragulus napu stanleyanus Gray, 1836
ca.1830s† Knowsley Woolfall (1990) p16.
Philippine Mouse-deer
Tragulus nigricans    
Nov 2016Chesterwww.chesterzoo.org

Moschidae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Siberian Musk Deer
Moschus moschiferus Linnaeus, 1758
ca.1895 Woburn Crandall (1964) p561: Hastings, Duke of Bedford (1949) ... says that a number of musk deer were liberated in wooded sections of the estate, but while several young were born, the species failed to become established. Flower (1929) p305: The first Musk-Deer ever brought alive to Europe was a female presented to the Society 31 March, 1869 ... it died 27 Oct. 1869. Several species of musk deer are now recognised but the Woburn animals are presumed to have been M. moschiferus. Edinburgh bred this species in 2007 (2005 dns).

Cervidae Goldfuss, 1820

Capreolinae Brookes, 1828

Taxon Date Location Notes
Eurasian Moose
Alces alces (Linnaeus, 1758)
1960 Whipsnade Huxley (1981) p60: 1960 was a bumper year with three British 'firsts': white-tailed deer [incorrect], moose and ... snow leopard. The first Moose imported into this country (in modern times) was a female sent to the Duke of Richmond by General Carleton, the governor general of Canada, in 1766 (this animal would have been an American Moose Alces americanus).
Marsh Deer
Blastocerus dichotomus (Illiger, 1815)
Late 1890s Woburn Loisel (1912) p47.
European Roe Deer
Capreolus capreolus (Linnaeus, 1758)
ca.1800 Milton Abbas Association of British Wild Animal Keepers: Ratel, Vol. 21, No. 1 (February 1994). First breedings for this species were also claimed by Edinburgh (1961/62) and Norfolk Wildlife Park (1960s).
Siberian Roe Deer
Capreolus pygargus (Pallas, 1771)
ca.1899* Woburn Loisel (1912) p44. This is a questionable captive breeding as the animals were turned loose outside the park boundary when they arrived.
Chinese Roe Deer
Capreolus pygargus bedfordi Thomas, 1908
Late 1890s Woburn Hastings (1949) p252. This is a questionable captive breeding as the animals were turned loose outside the park boundary when they arrived.
South American Red Brocket
Mazama americana (Erxleben, 1777)
ca.1895* Woburn Loisel (1912) p44.
Mule Deer
Odocoileus hemionus (Rafinesque, 1817)
Late 18th C ? A private estate? Further research required.
White-tailed Deer
Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann, 1780)
Pre 1830
1834E
?1
London2
[1] Not Knowsley. Further research required.
[2] Flower (1929) p320: Twenty-one born in the Gardens 1834-1927, and two hybrids between this species and O. mexicanus, one in 1865, one in 1879 (mexicanus is nowadays treated as a subspecies of O. virginianus). Whipsnade claimed a first breeding for this species in 1960 (Huxley, 1981 p60). This species is also known as the Virginian Deer.
Pampas Deer
Ozotoceros bezoarticus (Linnaeus, 1758)
May 1875* London Flower (1929) p322 as Blastocerus bezoarticus: Two born in the Gardens, one 5 May, 1875, one 17 Aug. 1881.
Southern Pudu
Pudu puda (Molina, 1782)
May 1932* London Crandall (1964) p594: Single births of the Chilean pudu occurred in the Zoological Gardens of London on May 23, 1932, and May 29, 1933 (Zuckerman, 1953).
Reindeer
Rangifer tarandus (Linnaeus, 1758)
1788 Ravensworth Castle Bewick (1970) p132: ... one in the possession of Sir H. G. Liddell, Bart. Which he brought over from Lapland, with four others, in 1786 ... To those brought over by Sir H. G. Liddell, five more were added the year following. They produced young ones, and gave promising hopes of thriving in this country: but, unfortunately, some of them were killed; and the others died, in consequence of a disorder similar to that called the rot in Sheep, which was attributed to the richness of the grass whereon they fed.

Cervinae Goldfuss, 1820

Taxon Date Location Notes
Axis Deer
Axis axis (Erxleben, 1777)
Early 18th C ? Bennett (1831) p256. Further research required.
Calamian Deer
Axis calamianensis (Heude, 1888)
1977/78 Plymouth Friends of Howletts and Port Lympne: Help Newsletter No. 3 (Summer 1980) p14: They left quarantine in Plymouth zoo in April 1978 having produced a female fawn.
Bawean Deer
Axis kuhlii (Temminck, 1836)
1956 London Zoological Society of London Report of the Council and Auditors for 1956, p10: The most notable births during the year have been ... a Kuhl's Deer ...
Hog Deer
Axis porcinus (Zimmermann, 1780)
ca.1773 Cobham 1 Lever (1992) p18: Immediately after Lord Clive's death in 1774, an inventory of the menagerie at Claremont revealed the presence of ... hog deer ...
Red Deer
Cervus elaphus Linnaeus, 1758
ca.1283E Lowther Castle Bostock (1993) p19: The red deer at Lowther Castle today are direct descendants of those enclosed when Sir Hugh de Louther was granted a licence to make a deerpark in 1283.
Barbary Red Deer
Cervus elaphus barbarus Bennett, 1833
1842E Knowsley Gray (1846-1850) p59.
Wapiti
Cervus elaphus canadensis Erxleben, 1777
Pre 1833* Windsor Berridge and Westell (1911) p6. Also bred on other private estates.
Maral
Cervus elaphus canadensis Erxleben 1777
ca.1898 Woburn Loisel (1912) p44. The Sibierian population were formally treated as a separate subspecies, C. e. sibiricus, but are now considered synonymous with Wapiti.
Hangul
Cervus elaphus yarkandensis Blanford, 1892
ca.1900 Woburn Loisel (1912) p45. Synonym: bactrianus.
Dybowski's Sika
Cervus nippon hortulorum Swinhoe, 1864
1911E London Flower (1929) p315 as Sika hortulorum: Five born in the Gardens 1911-1914.
Japanese Sika
Cervus nippon nippon Temminck, 1838
ca.1860
1861
Enniskerry1
London2
[1] Lever (1992) p39: Lord Powerscourt ... imported to Ireland, through the German-born animal-dealer Carl Jamrach, a Japanese sika stag and three hinds.
[2] Flower (1929) p314 as Sika nippon: Twenty-six born in the Gardens 1901-1922.
Manchurian Sika
Cervus nippon mantchuricus Swinhoe, 1864
ca.1895 Woburn Loisel (1912) p44.
Vietnamese Sika
Cervus nippon pseudaxis Gervais, 1841
2000 Woburn Association of British Wild Animal Keepers: Ratel, Vol. 27, No. 5 (October 2000) p154.
Taiwanese Sika
Cervus nippon taiouanus Blyth, 1860
Jul 1868* London Flower (1929) p315 as Sika taiouanus: One born in the Gardens 21 July, 1868, and five hybrids, Sika nippon ? x S. taiouanus ?, born 1904-1908. The latter births would now be regarded as subspecific hybrids.
European Fallow Deer
Dama dama dama (Linnaeus, 1758)
1475E Windsor Berridge (1932) p36 (discussing the origins of the dark pahase of this species): ... the breed was known to exist in Windsor Park as early as 1465. Hybrids between D. d. dama and D. d. mesopotamica were born at London in 1878 and later at Woburn.
Persian Fallow Deer
Dama dama mesopotamica (Brooke, 1875)
1880* London Flower (1929) p308 as D. mesopotamica: Six born in the Gardens 1880-1887, and seven hybrids, C. mesopotamica ? x C. dama ?, 1871-1885 (including two ¾-bred mesopotamica).
Tufted Deer
Elaphodus cephalophus Milne-Edwards, 1872
Jun 2009 Twycross Independent Zoo Enthusiasts Society: Zoo Grapevine, Summer 2009: A UK first breeding of Tufted Deer on 18th June 2009 is the latest news from Twycross.
Père David's Deer
Elaphurus davidianus Milne-Edwards 1866
1895 Woburn Edwards (1996) p171: In 1894 ... the 11th Duke of Bedford acquired his first pair and the first fawn was born at Woburn Abbey in 1895. Further animals were acquired up to 1901 and breeding became a regular occurrence; by 1914 the Woburn herd numbered 88 animals.
Indian Muntjac
Muntiacus muntjak (Zimmermann, 1780)
ca.1840s* Knowsley Keeling (2000) p65 (discussing the sale of the Knowsley collection by auction in October 1851): These Muntjac are interesting, as Lot 1 was Indian (Muntiacus muntjak), whereas the other two were "Crosses between an Indian and a Chinese species", the rarer Chinese Muntjac being M. reevesi. Interestingly, each purchase was home-bred.
Reeves' Muntjac
Muntiacus reevesi (Ogilby, 1839)
Jul 1838† London Flower (1929) p306: Mr. John Russell Reeves presented a pair 26 May, 1838; the male died 8 Aug. 1838, the female gave birth to a fawn 15 July, 1838, but died 31 Aug. 1838. The male was made the type of the species by Mr. Ogilby ... Thirteen born in the Gardens 1838-1881.
White-lipped Deer
Przwalskium albirostris (Przewalski, 1883)
2009 Edinburgh The zoo acquired several new animals earlier in the year and the calf may have been born to a female which arrived pregnant.
Barasingha
Rucervus duvaucelii (G. Cuvier, 1823)
Jul 1858E London Flower (1929) p313: Seven born in the Gardens 1858-1912. Possibly bred earlier on an estate.
Eld's Deer
Rucervus eldii (M'Clelland, 1842)
ca.1897 Woburn Loisel (1912) p44.
Philippine Spotted Deer
Rusa alfredi Sclater, 1870
Dec 1871 London Flower (1929) p310: Four born in the Gardens 1871-1875. Also two hybrid Deer were born in the Gardens, 26 Dec. 1871, and 29 Dec. 1872, respectively, between Cervus alfredi ? and Cervus nigricans ?, both parents being the type individuals of their respective species. nigricans is now treated as a subspecies of the Philippine Deer Rusa marianna making these births hybrids.
Timor Deer
Rusa timorensis (de Blainville, 1822)
1849E
ca.1850
London1
Knowsley2
[1] Flower (1929) p311 as R. tunjuc: Three born in the Gardens 1849-1857.
[2] Woolfall (1990) p12.
Sambar
Rusa unicolor (Kerr, 1792)
1836E London Flower (1929) p311: Fifty-four born in the Gardens 1836-1925. Possibly bred earlier on an estate.
Malayan Sambar
Rusa unicolor equina (G. Cuvier, 1823)
ca.1895 Woburn Hastings (1949) p260.

Hydropotinae Trouessart, 1898

Taxon Date Location Notes
Chinese Water Deer
Hydropotes inermis Swinhoe, 1870
ca.1880s/90s Woburn Crandall (1964) p561.

Antilocapridae Gray, 1866

Taxon Date Location Notes
Pronghorn
Antilocapra americana (Ord, 1815)
1964* Whipsnade International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 6 (1966) p402.

Giraffidae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Giraffe
Giraffa camelopardalis (Linnaeus, 1758)
May 1841 London Flower (1929) p304: Twenty-one born in the Gardens 1839-1914. This was the first captive breeding in the world. London 1839 dns: Born 19.06.1839 and survived for nine days. Three males and one female giraffe arrived at the zoo from Western Sudan in 1836 (at the time these animals were regarded as Kordofan Giraffes, Giraffa camelopardalis antiquorum, but this taxon is now considered synonomous with G. c. camelopardalis). 17 calves were born and raised between 1841 and 1892 when the last of the original stock died out.
Okapi
Okapia johnstoni (P. L. Sclater, 1901)
1966 Bristol Warin and Warin (1985) p57: ... the first calf was born in 1963. Disappointingly this, and also a second baby [1965], died in the first two or three weeks. The first calf was a male and died after one month; the mounted skin is on show at the Bristol City Museum. International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 8 (1968) p310.

Bovidae Gray, 1821

Aepycerotinae Gray, 1872

Taxon Date Location Notes
Impala
Aepyceros melampus (Lichtenstein, 1812)
1947E London? Zoological Society of London: Zoo Life, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Summer 1947), p44: Many young animals have been born at Regent's Park and at Whipsnade, among them ... a Kenya Impala (the first time in the Society's history) ...

Alcelaphinae Brooke, 1876

Taxon Date Location Notes
Hartebeest
Alcelaphus buselaphus (Pallas, 1766)
1897† Woburn Loisel (1912) p78.
White-tailed Gnu
Connochaetes gnou (Zimmermann, 1780)
1894E London Flower (1929) p277: Five born in the Gardens 1894-1913.
Brindled Gnu
Connochaetes taurinus (Burchell, 1824)
1900E
ca.1900
London1
Woburn2
[1] Flower (1929) p277: Four born in the Gardens 1900-1910.
[2] Loisel (1912) p45.
White-bearded Gnu
Connochaetes taurinus albojubatus Thomas, 1892
1914E London Flower (1929) p277: Five born in the Gardens 1914-1919.
Bontebok
Damaliscus pygargus (Pallas, 1767)
ca.1848 Knowsley Fisher (2002) p118: Thomas Moore catalogued all the livestock then [October 1851] present at Knowsley. He listed four Bontebok (of which at least two had been born on the estate). Both subspecies (the Bontebok D. p. pygargus and the Blesbok D. p. phillipsi) have been kept in this country - further research required.

Antilopinae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Springbok
Antidorcas marsupialis (Zimmermann, 1780)
1906E Leonardslee Keeling (1999) p71: In 1905 ... while the following year the newly-arrived Springboks began to breed, an activiry that continued until 1912, after which the old bugbear of too small a gene pool made itself all too apparent ...
The National Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland (Zoo Federation News, No. 33, Spring 1982) gave a first breeding award to Belfast Zoo for a male calf born 11.03.1981.
Blackbuck
Antilope cervicapra (Linnaeus, 1758)
Late 18th C ? A private estate? Possibly Windsor.
Thomson's Gazelle
Eudorcas thomsonii (Günther, 1884)
Nov 1951E Whipsnade Zoological Society of London: Zoo Life, Vol. 6, No. 4 (Winter 1951), p122: A female Thomson's gazelle fawn born towards the end of November is, we hope, the start of a successful herd of these interesting animals.
Indian Gazelle
Gazella bennettii (Sykes, 1831)
Nov 1883 London Flower (1929) p290: One born in the Gardens 30 Nov. 1883.
Cuvier's Gazelle
Gazella cuvieri (Ogilby, 1841)
Apr 1859 London Flower (1929) p290: One born in the Gardens 3 April, 1859
Dorcas Gazelle
Gazella dorcas (Linnaeus, 1758)
1849
ca.1850
London1
Knowsley2
[1] Flower (1929) p292: Six born in the Gardens 1849-1859.
[2] Keeling (2000) p64 (discussing the sale of the Knowsley collection by auction in October 1851): The Addax, Dorcas Gazelle, Harnessed Antelopes, Passenger Pigeons and Stanley Crane were all Knowsley-bred.
Mountain Gazelle
Gazella gazella muscatensis Brooke, 1874
Mar 1882 London Flower (1929) p291 as G. muscatensis: One born in the Gardens 6 March, 1882. Flower also listed a birth of G. arabica in 1904, but this taxon is only known from two specimens and it is likely that these animals were actually a subspecies of G. gazella.
Goitered Gazelle
Gazella subgutturosa (Guldenstaedt, 1780)
May 1875E London Flower (1929) p289: Twelve born in the Gardens 1875-1926.
Marica Gazelle
Gazella subgutturosa marica Thomas, 1897
Jun 1927E London Flower (1929) p291 as G. marica: One born in the Gardens 12 June, 1927.
Kirk's Dik-dik
Madoqua kirkii (Günther, 1880)
? Colchester? Further research required.
Mhorr Gazelle
Nanger dama mhorr (Bennett, 1833)
Feb 1998 Belfast Belfast Zoo: Zoo Crack No. 42 (Spring 1998): The successful birth and rearing of a mhorr gazelle is an especially noteworthy event in the Zoo's history, as not only is this the first breeding of this species in the Zoo and the UK ... Possibly earlier (ca.1847) at Knowsley - see Appendix 1.
Dama Gazelle
Nanger dama ruficollis (C. H. Smith, 1827)
Dec 1980 London Zoo Federation News, No. 30, Spring 1981 under Breeding & Husbandry Awards for 1980: First Captive Breeding in the U. K. Progeny reared to independence by parents. Born whilst in quarantine for Marwell and the first breeding award was shared between the two collections.
Grant's Gazelle
Nanger granti (Brooke, 1872)
Sep 1951E Whipsnade Zoological Society of London: Zoo Life, Vol. 6, No. 4 (Winter 1951), p122: The pair of Grant's gazelles produced a female calf at the beginning of September.
Steppe Saiga
Saiga tatarica (Linnaeus, 1766)
May 1903 Woburn The Field, 27 Jun 1903, p1090. The first animal imported into this country was a male received at London in exchange from Moscow in Nov 1864. Woburn's animals arrived in Jun 1902.

Bovinae Bray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
American Bison
Bison bison (Linnaeus, 1758)
Apr 1824* Glynliffon Keeling (1985) p61: Three buffaloes (probably American Bison) arrived Glynliffon in June 1823, one of which calved the following April.
European Bison
Bison bonasus (Linnaeus, 1758)
ca.1908 Woburn Loisel (1912) p75. The first animals imported into this country arrived at London Zoo in 1847 (they did not breed this species until 1914).
Gayal
Bos frontalis Lambert, 1804
Jan 1882 London Sclater (1901) p217: The breeding of the Gayal is believed to be the first recorded instance in Europe.
Gaur
Bos frontalis gaurus C. H. Smith, 1827
Jun 1982 London Zoo Federation News, No. 36, Spring 1983 under Breeding & Husbandry Awards for 1982: First Captive Breeding in the U. K. Progeny reared to independence by parents. A male calf was born 01.06.1992.
Yak
Bos grunniens Linnaeus, 1766
Jun 1863E London Flower (1929) p260 as Poephagus grunniens: Twenty-five born in the Gardens 1863-1906.
Banteng
Bos javanicus d'Alton, 1823
1961 Whipsnade Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1961. London 1910 dns.
Ankole Cattle
Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758
1951E Whipsnade Street (1953) p53: They have settled down well, two calves having already been born and successfully reared, one cow breeding in 1951 and the other in 1952. Belle Vue and Whipsnade both acquired Ankole Cattle in 1950 and Belle Vue could have bred them first (Belle Vue Zoo, Manchester, Illustrated Guide, 1956).
Nilgai
Boselaphus tragocamelus (Pallas, 1766)
1768 Cobham 1 Bewick (1970) p113: Several of this species were brought to this country in the year 1767, which continued to breed annually for some years after. Jennison (1927) p258: Lord Clive received a pair in 1767, which bred regularly in England.
Water Buffalo
Bubalus bubalis (Linnaeus, 1758)
ca.1764E Buckingham Gate? The Bartlett Society Newsletter, July 2000.
Lowland Anoa
Bubalus depressicornis (C. H. Smith, 1827)
Late 1890s Woburn Loisel (1912) p46.
Cape Buffalo
Syncerus caffer caffer (Sparrman, 1779)
Dec 1872E London Flower (1929) p263: Eight born in the Gardens: seven in the years 1872-1882, and one 8 Feb. 1927. Possibly earlier on an estate.
Congo Buffalo
Syncerus caffer nanus (Boddaert, 1785)
Mar 1980 Marwell Adams (ca.1993) p46: Notable births that year [1979] were the first jaguar cubs, and the first Congo buffalo ever bred in Britain.
Zoo Federation News, No. 30, Spring 1981 under Breeding & Husbandry Awards for 1980: First Captive Breeding in the U. K. Progeny reared to independence by parents. A female was born 30.03.1980.
Common Eland
Taurotragus oryx (Pallas, 1766)
1844 Knowsley Flower (1929) p301: Elands were first imported alive into England in 1840 by the Earl of Derby, President of the Zoological Society 1831-1851, who bequethed five to the society. These arrived in the Gardens 6 Dec. 1851; there were two young pairs imported from Africa and one female that had bred at Knowsley in 1844 or 1846.
Chousingha
Tetracerus quadricornis (de Blainville, 1816)
ca.1842
1882
Knowsley1
London2
[1] Woolfall (1990) p18. From a post-sale newspaper report of 1851: A male four-horned antelope, from Nepaul ... A female adult of the same species, bred at Knowsley ... A male of the same species nearly full grown, also bred at Knowsley. Twin fawns, both males, bred at Knowsley ... These last comprise the only specimens of four-horned antelopes in the country.
[2] Flower (1929) p302: Seven born in the Gardens 1882-1905.
Nyala
Tragelaphus angasii Angas, 1849
Aug 1972 Marwell International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 14 (1974) p132. Jordan and Ormrod (1978) p237: Also to be seen here are ... nyala (the first to breed in this country for over 100 years) ...
Bongo
Tragelaphus eurycerus (Ogilby, 1837)
1974E Woburn International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 16 (1976) p404. Woburn Wild Animal Kingdom guidebook, 1977: At Woburn is what is believed to be the first bongo born in captivity (it is possible that this calf was born at Plymouth or Southampton while the animals were serving quarantine). However, a calf was born 12th December 1936 on board a ship travelling from East Africa to London. It died at London Zoo in 4th May 1938.
Lesser Kudu
Tragelaphus imberbis (Blyth, 1869)
2008E Edinburgh Royal Zoological Society of Scotland: Edinburgh Zoo Animal Inventory 2008.
Bushbuck
Tragelaphus scriptus (Pallas, 1766)
ca.1841* Knowsley Gray (1846-1850) p29.
Sitatunga
Tragelaphus spekii Speke, 1863
Feb 1896 London Flower (1929) p300: Three born in the Gardens 1907-1910. Two hybrids born in the Gardens, T. gratus ? x T. selousi ?, one 12 Feb. 1896, and one 28 Feb. 1897. gratus and selousi are now treated as a subspecies of T. spekii making these latter births subspecific hybrids. Belle Vue claimed a first breeding for this species in 1952 (some sources state 1951).
Greater Kudu
Tragelaphus strepsiceros (Pallas, 1766)
1971
Jul 1971
London1
Chester2
[1] Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1971, p12: The list of births for the year also includes ... a female Greater Kudu which, unlike last year's calf, is thriving.
[2] International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 13 (1973) p341.

Caprinae Gray, 1821

Taxon Date Location Notes
Barbary Sheep
Ammotragus lervia (Pallas, 1777)
1854* London Flower (1929) p266: At least 152 born in the Gardens 1854-1927.
Mishmi Takin
Budorcas taxicolor taxicolor Hodgson, 1850
Jun 2006 Marwell John Adams (personal communication). Flower (1929) p273: The first Takin to reach Europe alive was a male presented [to the Zoological Society of London] 22 June, 1909.
East Caucasian Tur
Capra caucasica cylindricornis Blyth, 1841
1911E London Flower (1929) p269: Six born in the Gardens 1911-1926, and forty hybrids between this species and C. sibirica 1910-1927.
Markhor
Capra falconeri (Wagner, 1839)
Apr 1867* London Flower (1929) p269: At least nine born in the Gardens 1867-1908, and twelve hybrids between male Markhor and female C. hircus 1864-1915.
Cretan Wild Goat
Capra hircus aegagrus Erxleben, 1777
1869* London Zuckerman in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1953, p880.
Alpine Ibex
Capra ibex Linnaeus, 1758
1971* Norfolk WP The Pheasant Trust and Norfolk Wildlife Park Annual Report 1971, p40: A young male Alpine Ibex was born on 29 May and succesfully reared. It is believed to be the first time this species has been bred in captivity in Britain. Norfolk WP 1970 dns.
See also entries under hybrids.
Nubian Ibex
Capra nubiana F. Cuvier, 1825
May 1854* London Flower (1929) p269: Two ibex born in the Gardens 11 May, 1854, appear to have been of this species. A hybrid C. nubiana ? x C. hircus ? was born 24 Feb. 1885.
Siberian Ibex
Capra sibirica (Pallas, 1776)
Jun 1926E London Zuckerman in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1953, p882.
Japanese Serow
Capricornis crispus (Temminck, 1836)
Jun 2006 Edinburgh Independent Zoo Enthusiasts Society: Zoo Grapevine, Autumn 2006: Young Japanese Serow at Edinburgh - A first UK breeding in June.
Himalayan Tahr
Hemitragus jemlahicus (C. H. Smith, 1826)
1885E London Flower (1929) p270: At least eighty-six born in the Gardens 1885-1927.
Chinese Goral
Naemorhedus griseus (Milne-Edwards, 1871)
2008E Edinburgh Royal Zoological Society of Scotland: Edinburgh Zoo Animal Inventory 2008.
Rocky Mountain Goat
Oreamnos americanus (de Blainville, 1816)
May 2006 Colchester www.colchester-zoo.co.uk
The first animal imported into this country was a young male which arrived at London in June 1900.
Musk Ox
Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780)
Jun 1969 Whipsnade Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1969, p25: The outstanding breeding success was the birth of two healthy bull Musk Ox calves ... These are the first Musk Oxen to be bred in captivity in the British Isles. The first animals imported into this country arrived at Woburn in 1903.
Argali
Ovis ammon (Linnaeus, 1758)
ca.1902 Woburn Crandall (1964) p708: In referring to argalis received at Woburn Abbey soon after the turn of the present century, Hastings, Duke of Bedford (1949), says that while the animals did well in yards and even bred ...
Marco Polo Sheep
Ovis ammon polii Blyth, 1841
1965 dns London International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 6 (1966) p90. Young were aborted in 1961 and 1963 and five lambs were stillborn in 1963. One male and two female lambs were born on 9 May 1965; both females were stillborn but the male was hand-reared and survived until 8 June 1965.
Mouflon
Ovis aries musimon (Pallas, 1811)
Pre 1785 Bulstrode Lever (1992) p17: The collection included ... moufflon ...
Urial
Ovis aries vignei Blyth, 1841
May 1858* London Flower (1929) p265 as O vignei: About twenty-one born in the Gardens 1858-1917.
Bighorn Sheep
Ovis canadensis Shaw, 1804
May 1932 London Guide to the Gardens and Aquarium in Regents Park (32nd ed., 1935) p27: The female died, but left a female lamb, born in May, 1932.
Bharal
Pseudois nayaur (Hodgson, 1833)
1882* London Flower (1929) p266 as P. nahoor: Forty-seven born in the Gardens 1882-1908.
Alpine Chamois
Rupicapra rupicapra (Linnaeus, 1758)
Aug 1864* London Flower (1929) p271: Five born in the Gardens 1864-1911.

Cephalophinae Gray, 1871

Taxon Date Location Notes
Bay Duiker
Cephalophus dorsalis Gray, 1846
1938 London Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1938, p?.
Red-flanked Duiker
Cephalophus rufilatus Gray, 1846
1847 dns Knowsley  Fisher (2002) p71: Subsequently, Whitfield imported another live female (from the River Gambia), which must have been the mother of a young male that died in November 1847, shortly after its birth at Knowsley.
Maxwell's Duiker
Philantomba maxwellii (C. H. Smith, 1827)
1855* London Flower (1929) p280 as Cephalophus maxwelli: Eight born in the Gardens 1855-1884.
Blue Duiker
Philantomba monticola (Thunberg, 1789)
Sep 2017Colchester www.colchester-zoo.com
Bush Duiker
Sylvicapra grimmia (Linnaeus, 1758)
1854* London Flower (1929) p281 as Cephalophus grimmi: Five born in the Gardens 1854-1885.
Crowned Duiker
Sylvicapra grimmia coronata (Gray, 1842)
Jul 1937* London Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1937, p?.

Hippotraginae Sundevall, 1845

Taxon Date Location Notes
Addax
Addax nasomaculatus (de Blainville, 1816)
1845 Knowsley Keeling (2000) p7: It was not until 1844 that he was able to obtain a male to make up a pair, from the Surrey Zoological Garden of all unlikely and unexpected places, and the next year they produced a male calf, the first time the species had ever bred in confinement.
Roan Antelope
Hippotragus equinus (E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 1803)
1974 Howletts Aspinall (1976) p110: Their calves born at Howletts are the first of their kind to be reared successfully in Britain. International Zoo Yearbook, Vol. 16 (1976) p406.
Sable Antelope
Hippotragus niger (Harris, 1838)
Late 1890s Woburn Loisel (1912) p47. Howletts claimed a first breeding for this species in the 1970s.
Beisa Oryx
Oryx beisa (Rüppell, 1835)
Apr 1881 London Sclater (1901) p216: ... probably the first instance of this Antelope breeding in capitivity.
Scimitar-horned Oryx
Oryx dammah (Cretzschmar, 1827)
1852* London Flower (1929) p296 as O. algazel: Nine born in the Gardens 1852-1864. Marwell claimed the first birth in this country occurred at Belle Vue in 1971 while the adults were serving quarantine en route to Marwell.
Gemsbok
Oryx gazella (Linnaeus, 1758)
Mar 1974E Marwell Marwell Zoo's Paper, No. 9 (July 1974) p3. Marwell received a group of 1.5 animals on 8th February 1974. A male calf was born on 23rd March 1974 but died the next day; however, a female calf born three days later survived. Both of calves would have been conceived while the adults were serving quarantine at Belle Vue, Manchester.
Arabian Oryx
Oryx leucoryx (Pallas, 1777)
Jan 1985 London Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1985-1986, p7: The birth of an Arabian Oryx, the first ever in Britain, was a milestone in a 25-year-old conservation success story.
Zoo Federation News, No. 45, Spring 1986 under Breeding & Husbandry Awards for 1985: First Captive Breeding in the U. K. Progeny reared to independence naturally. Two calves were born in 1985: 25.01.1985 and 18.12.1985.

Reduncinae Knottnerus-Meyer, 1907

Taxon Date Location Notes
Ellipsen Waterbuck
Kobus ellipsiprymnus ellipsiprymnus (Ogilby, 1833)
1893 London Sclater (1901) p234: The most interesting birth was that of a female Waterbuck (Cobus ellipsiprymnus), the first example, so far as is known, of this antelope bred in captivity.
Defassa Waterbuck
Kobus ellipsiprymnus defassa (Rüppell, 1835)
ca.1897 Woburn Loisel (1912) p45.
Kob
Kobus kob (Erxleben, 1777)
ca.1843*
May 1957
Knowsley1
Belle Vue2
[1] Woolfall (1990) p16.
[2] Belle Vue Zoo, Manchester, Illustrated Guide, 1958 p14.
Red Lechwe
Kobus leche Gray, 1850
Dec 1925 London Berridge (1932) p66: The first ever imported into this country arrived at the London Zoological Gardens in the year 1860, but it was not until 1924 that the species was again represented in the menagerie. On December 25th, 1925, the first young one was born, and since then several others have been reared
Nile Lechwe
Kobus megaceros (Fitzinger, 1855)
1992 Whipsnade Zoological Society of London Annual Report 1992-1993, p18: The first Nile lechwe to be born in the United Kingdom was reared successfully.
Southern Reedbuck
Redunca arundinum (Boddaert, 1785)
1933*† London Zuckerman in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1953, p885.
Bohor Reedbuck
Redunca redunca (Pallas, 1767)
Sep 1926*† London Zuckerman in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1953, p885.

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